#70

#70

December 14, 2010


There is no template for impeccability, but there is this: if you do something that you know (feel, suspect, believe) is bad for you, it is very likely bad for you. If you do something that you know (etc.) is good for you, it is very likely good for you.

So if going home to put my feet up with pizza and wine and a movie is something that I believe to be bad for me, it would behoove me to either change my belief about it or not do it. In other words, going home to put my feet up with pizza and wine and a movie is neutral — neither impeccable or not impeccable; neither fulfilling or not fulfilling, neither good nor bad. If I believe it’s bad, it’s bad. If I believe it’s beneficial, then it’s beneficial.

And I can’t pretend to believe it’s beneficial. That’s the same as believing it’s bad.

Impeccability could be described as following what you know to be true. Impeccability could be described as my actions being in alignment with my truth.

But wait.

What about people who harass women entering a clinic for an abortion? Might the harassers be in alignment with their truth? Are they being impeccable?

What about peace activists who lie down in front of tanks? Are they being impeccable?

Can people whose actions I deplore be acting impeccably?

But wait!

Is it my business whether or not anyone else is being impeccable? Can I know anything about anyone else’s truth? If I am concerned about impeccability, only MY impeccability is worth my concern.

Do you remember that a couple of weeks ago feeling glum was my ally? Feeling glum reminded me to emanate love. Well, here’s another ally — when I find myself questioning another’s impeccability, it is a reminder for me to tend to my own.